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Six Trait Presentation Collaboration Rubric

Page history last edited by Ms. Edwards 11 years, 9 months ago

Six Trait Rubric [1] [2]

 

For a complete Rubric, see http://spreadsheets.google.com/pub?key=phjMpIkPupK9O4GELMAPfSw .

 

  Pass Pass Not Pass Not Pass Not Pass
Criteria Professional: 4 Journeyman: 3 Apprentice: 2 Novice: 1 Rookie: 0

Ideas/Content

Development

 

Maintains consistent focus on topic and has selected and relevant details--

This paper is clear and focused and holds the reader's attention.

Relevant anecdotes and details enrich the central theme or storyline.

* Ideas are fresh and original.

* The writer  writes from knowledge or experience

and shows insight: an understanding of life and a knack for

picking out what is significant.

* Relevant, telling, quality details give the reader important

information that goes beyond the obvious or predictable and tells the reader something new.

* The writer develops the topic in an enlightening, purposeful

way that makes a point or tells a story.

* Every piece adds something to the whole.

Maintains adequate focus on the topic and has adequate supporting details--

This paper is clear and focused. It holds the reader's attention.

Adequate anecdotes and details add to the central theme or storyline.

* Ideas are fresh and interesting.

* The writer seems to be writing from knowledge or experience and an understanding of life.

* Relevant, telling, quality details give the reader important

information that goes beyond the obvious or predictable and tells the reader something new.

* The writer develops the topic in an interesting, purposeful

way that makes a point.

* Almost every piece adds something to the whole.

Demonstrates an inconsistent focus and includes some supporting details, but may include extraneous or loosely related material, and/or ideas jump around.
The writer is beginning to define the topic, even though development is still basic or general.

* It is pretty easy to see where the writer is headed, though more information is needed to "fill in the blanks."

* The writer seems to be drawing on knowledge or experience, but has difficulty going from general observations to specifics.

* Ideas are reasonably clear, though they may not be detailed, personalized, or expanded enough to show in-depth understanding or a strong sense of purpose.

* Support is attempted, but doesn't go far enough yet in

fleshing out the main point or storyline.

* Details often blend the original with the predictable--

*reader must guess--not enough new ideas provided

Demonstrates little or no focus and few supporting details which may be inconsistent or interfere with the meaning of the text.--undeveloped; needs major improvements in most areas below:

As yet, the paper has no clear sense of purpose or central theme. To extract meaning from the text, the reader must make inferences based on sketchy details. The writing reflects more than one of these problems:

* The writer is still in search of a topic, or has not begun to define the topic in a meaningful, personal way.

* Information is very limited or unclear.

* The text may be repetitious, or may read like a collection of

disconnected, random thoughts.

* Everything seems as important as everything else; the reader has a hard time sifting out what's critical.

Demonstrates little or no focus.

 

A bare beginning; writer not yet showing any control

Organization:

Structure and form

Has a logical organizational pattern and conveys a sense of completeness
and wholeness
--- -excels in all areas below:

The organization enhances and showcases the central idea or storyline. The order, structure or presentation of information is compelling and moves the reader through the text.

* Details fit where they're placed; sequencing is

logical and effective.

* An inviting introduction draws the reader in; a satisfying

conclusion leaves the reader with a sense of resolution.

* Pacing is well controlled; the writer knows when to slow down

and elaborate, and when to pick up the pace and move on.

* Organization flows very smoothly -- the reader hardly thinks about it.

*Organization fits the audience and purpose

{entertain (story, joke, etc.), inform (report, essay), persuade (letter, editorial, etc.), express (report, essay)}

{introduction, body, conclusion}

{setting & characters, problem, solution/conclusion}


 
Has a logical organizational pattern and conveys a sense of wholeness and completeness, although some lapses occur---on target!--meets all criteria- minor improvements only in areas below:

The organizational structure is strong enough to move the reader through the text without undue confusion.

* Details seem to fit where they're placed; sequencing is

logical and effective.

* An introduction draws the reader in; a

conclusion leaves the reader with a sense of resolution.

* Pacing is controlled; the writer knows when to slow down and elaborate, and when to pick up the pace and move on.

* Organization flows so the reader hardly thinks about it.

*Organization fits the audience and purpose

{entertain (story, joke, etc.), inform (report, essay), persuade (letter, editorial, etc.), express (report, essay)}

{introduction, body, conclusion}

{setting & characters, problem, solution/conclusion}

Shows an attempt at an organizational pattern, but exhibits little sense of wholeness and completeness;

partially meets criteria; needs improvement in several areas below:

The organizational structure sometimes moves the reader through the text without undue confusion.

* The paper has a recognizable introduction and conclusion. The

introduction may not create a strong sense of anticipation;

the conclusion may not tie up all loose ends.

* Sequencing is usually logical, but may sometimes be so

predictable that the structure takes attention away from the

content.

* Pacing is fairly well controlled, though the writer sometimes

spurts ahead too quickly or spends too much time on details that do not matter.

* The organization sometimes supports the main point or

storyline; at other times, the reader feels an urge to slip in a transition or move things around.

* Organization meets audience and purpose (see 3 & 4), but needs improvement in some of those organizational areas

Has little evidence of an organizational pattern or any sense of wholeness
and completeness
-- undeveloped; needs major improvements in most areas below:

The writing lacks a clear sense of direction. Ideas, details or events seem strung together in a loose or random fashion--or else there is no identifiable internal structure. The writing reflects more than one of these problems:

* Sequencing needs work.

* There is no real lead to set up what follows, no real

conclusion to wrap things up.

* Pacing feels awkward; the writer slows to a crawl when the reader wants to get on with it, and vice versa.

* Problems with organization make it hard for the reader to get a grip on the main point or storyline.


 

No organiztion-- no structure; only sentences or phrases strung together

 

A bare beginning; writer not yet showing any control

Organization:

Transitions

Provides transitions which clearly serve to connect ideas

* Thoughtful transitions clearly show how ideas connect.

Provides adequate transitions in an attempt to connect ideas

* Transitions clearly show how ideas connect.

Provides transitions which are weak or inconsistent

* Transitions often work well; at other times, connections

between ideas are fuzzy.

Provides transitions which are poorly utilized, or fails to provide transitions

* Connections between ideas are confusing or missing.

Few or no transitons

 

A bare beginning; writer not yet showing any control

Word Choice

Uses language effectively by exhibiting word choices that are engaging and appropriate for intended audience and purpose--

wowser!--excels in  all criteria:

Words convey the intended message in a precise, interesting and natural way.

* Words are relevant, specific and accurate; it is easy to understand

just what the writer means.

* The language is natural and never overdone; phrasing is

highly individual.

* Lively verbs energize the writing. Precise nouns and

modifiers create pictures in the reader's mind.

* Striking words and phrases often catch the reader's eye--and

linger in the reader's mind.

* Cliches and jargon are used sparingly, only for effect.

* Words include imagery, metaphor, simile, alliteration, consonance, assonance, personification, or technical details to create pictures in the reader's mind.

Uses adequate language and appropriate word choices for intended audience
and purpose

on target!--meets all criteria- minor improvements only in areas below:

Words convey the intended message in an interesting and natural way.

* Words are specific and accurate; it is easy to understand

just what the writer means.

* The language is natural and seldom overdone.

* Lively verbs energize the writing. Precise nouns and

modifiers create pictures in the reader's mind.

* Cliches and jargon are used sparingly, only for effect.

* Words include imagery, metaphor, simile, alliteration, consonance, assonance, personification, or technical details to create pictures in the reader's mind.


 

Has a limited and predictable vocabulary which may not be appropriate for the intended audience and purpose--

The language is functional, even if it lacks punch; it is easy to figure out the writer's meaning on a general level.

* Words are almost always correct and adequate; they simply

lack flair.

* Familiar words and phrases communicate, but rarely capture

the reader's imagination. Still, the paper may have one or

two fine moments.

* Attempts at colorful language come close to the mark, but

sometimes seem overdone.

* Energetic verbs or picturesque phrases liven things up now

and then; the reader longs for more.

* Words include some instances of imagery, metaphor, simile, alliteration, or technical details to create some pictures in the reader's mind.

Has a limited or inappropriate vocabulary for the intended audience and purpose--undeveloped; needs major improvements in most areas below:

The writer struggles with a limited vocabulary, searching for words to convey meaning. The writing reflects more than one of these problems:

* Language is so vague (e.g., It was a fun time, She was neat,

It was nice, We did lots of stuff) that only the most general

message comes through.

* Persistent redundancy distracts the reader.

* Jargon or cliche*s serve as a crutch.

* Words are used incorrectly, sometimes making the message hard

to decipher.

* Problems with language leave the reader wondering what the

writer is trying to say.


 

General words; ordinary, everyday words that do not create specific images or ideas

 

A bare beginning; writer not yet showing any control

Sentence Fluency Includes sentences, or phrases where appropriate, of varied length and structure --excels all criteria:

The writing has an easy flow and rhythm when read aloud. Sentences are well built, with strong and varied structure that invites expressive oral reading.

* Sentences are constructed in a way that helps make meaning clear.

* Purposeful sentence beginnings show how each sentence relates

to and builds upon the one before it.

* The writing has cadence, as if the writer has thought about the sound of the words as well as the meaning.

* Sentences vary in length as well as structure.

* Fragments, if used, add style.

* Dialogue, if used, sounds natural.

Includes sentences, or phrases where appropriate, that are somewhat varied
in length and structure
--on target!--minor improvements only in areas below:

The text hums along with a steady beat, but tends to be more pleasant or businesslike than musical, more mechanical than fluid.

* Sentences are constructed in a way that helps make meaning clear.

* Purposeful sentence beginnings builds upon the one before it (see 2).

* Sentences vary in length as well as structure.

* Fragments, if used, add style.

* Dialogue, if used, sounds natural.


 
Shows limited variety in sentence length and structure --


* Sentences may not seem artfully crafted or musical, but they are usually grammatical. They hang together.

* There is at least some variation in sentence length and

structure. Sentence beginnings are mostly all alike.

* The reader sometimes has to hunt for clues (e.g., connecting

words and phrases like however, therefore, naturally, after a while, on the other hand, to be specific, for example, next,

first of all, later, but as it turned out, although, etc.)

that show how sentences interrelate.

* Parts of the text invite expressive oral reading; others may be stiff, awkward, choppy or gangly. With a little revision the paper would be

pretty easy to read.

Has little or no variety in sentence length and structure --

The reader has to practice quite a bit in order to give this paper

a fair interpretive reading. The writing reflects more than one of

the following problems:

* Sentences are choppy, incomplete, rambling or awkward; they

need work.

* Phrasing does not sound natural, the way someone might speak.

The reader must sometimes pause or read over to get the

meaning.

* Many sentences begin the same way--and may follow the same

patterns (e.g., subject-verb-object) in a monotonous pattern.

* Endless connectives (and, and so, but then, because, and

then, etc.) create a massive jumble of language in which

clear sentence beginnings and endings get swallowed up.

* The text does not invite expressive oral reading.

Run-ons, phrases, or sentences are all alike in length and structure (all subject-verb, for example)

 

A bare beginning; writer not yet showing any control

Voice Allows the reader to sense the person behind the words--The writer speaks directly to the reader in a way that is individualistic, expressive and engaging. Clearly, the writer is involved in the text, is sensitive to the needs of an audience, and is writing to be read.

* The reader feels a strong interaction with the writer,

sensing the person behind the words.

* The tone and voice give flavor to the message and are

appropriate for the purpose and audience.

* Narrative writing seems honest, appealing, and written from

the heart.

* Expository or persuasive writing reflects a strong commitment

to the topic, and an effort to bring the topic to life by

anticipating the reader's questions, and showing why the

reader should care or want to know more.

*Reader can imagine "mind movies" from the carefully crafted imagery

Provides the reader with some sense of the person behind the words-- The writer speaks to the reader in a way that is expressive and interesting. The writer is involved in the text, is sensitive to the needs of an audience, and is writing to be read.

* The reader feels an interaction with the writer, sensing the person behind the words.

* The tone and voice match the message and seem

appropriate for the purpose and audience.

* Narrative writing seems honest and written from the heart.

* Expository or persuasive writing reflects a commitment to the topic, and an effort to bring the topic to life by showing why the reader should care or want to know more.

*Reader can imagine "mind movies" from the carefully crafted imagery

 

Attempts somewhat to give the reader a sense of the person behind the words-- The writer seems sincere, but not fully engaged or involved. The result is pleasant or even personable, but not compelling.

* The writing communicates in a pleasing manner.

Moments here and there surprise, amuse or move the reader.

* Voice may emerge strongly on occasion, then retreat behind

general, dispassionate language.

* The writing hides as much of the writer as it reveals.

* The writer seems aware of an audience, but often to weigh words carefully or discard personal insights in favor of safe

generalities.


 

 

Provides the reader with little sense of the person behind the words-- The writer seems indifferent, uninvolved or distanced from the topic and/or the audience-- little committment or care. As a result, the writing is lifeless or mechanical; depending on the topic, it may be overly technical or jargonistic. The paper reflects more than one of the following problems:

* It is hard to sense the writer behind the words. The writer does not seem to reach out to an audience, or to anticipate

their interests and questions.

* The writer speaks in a kind of monotone that flattens all potential highs or lows of the message.

* The writing may communicate on a functional level, but it

does not move or involve the reader.

* The writer does not seem sufficiently at home with the topic

to take risks, share personal insights or make the topic/story personal and real for the reader.

 

Provides no sense of reader -- no committment; The writer seems indifferent, uninvolved or distanced from the topic and/or the audience. As a result, the writing is lifeless or mechanical.

 

A bare beginning; writer not yet showing any control

Conventions Consistently follows the rules of Standard English for grammar and usage
Consistently follows the rules of Standard English for spelling of commonly used words
Consistently follows the rules of Standard English for capitalization
Consistently follows the rules of Standard English for punctuation
Exhibits the use of complete sentences except where purposeful fragments are used for effect
Indicates paragraphs consistently
 
Generally follows the rules of Standard English for grammar and usage
Generally follows the rules of Standard English for spelling of commonly  used words
Generally follows the rules of Standard English for capitalization
Generally follows the rules of Standard English for punctuation
Generally exhibits the use of complete sentences except where purposeful fragments are used for effect
Indicates paragraphs for the most part
 
Mostly does not follow the rules of Standard English for grammar and usage
Mostly does not follow the rules of Standard English for spelling of commonly used words
Mostly does not follow the rules of Standard English for capitalization
Mostly does not follow the rules of Standard English for punctuation
Exhibits errors in sentence structure that impede communication
Mostly does not indicate paragraphs
 
Does not follow the rules of Standard English for grammar and usage
Does not follow the rules of Standard English for spelling of commonly used words
Does not follow the rules of Standard English for capitalization
Does not follow the rules of Standard English for punctuation
Exhibits errors in sentence structure that impede communication
Does does not indicate paragraphs

Seem to not know the rules;

 

A bare beginning; writer not yet showing any control

Presentation

The form and presentation of the text enhances the ability for the reader to understand and connect with the message. It is pleasing to the eye.

A. If handwritten (either cursive or printed), the slant is consistent, letters are clearly formed, spacing is
uniform between words, and the text is easy to read.
B. If word-processed, there is appropriate use of fonts and font sizes which invites the reader into the text.
C. The use of white space on the page (spacing, margins, etc.) allows the intended audience to easily focus on
the text and message without distractions. There is just the right amount of balance of white space and text
on the page. The formatting suits the purpose for writing.
D. The use of a title, side heads, page numbering, bullets, and evidence of correct use of a style sheet (when
appropriate) makes it easy for the reader to access the desired information and text. These markers allow
the hierarchy of information to be clear to the reader.
E. When appropriate to the purpose and audience, there is effective integration of text and illustrations,
charts, graphs, maps, tables, etc. There is clear alignment between the text and visuals. The visuals
support and clarify important information or key points made in the text.

The form and presentation of the text lets the reader understand the message. It is pleasing to the eye. A. If handwritten (either cursive or printed), the slant is consistent, letters are clearly formed, spacing is
uniform between words, and the text is easy to read.
B. If word-processed, there is appropriate use of fonts and font sizes which invites the reader into the text.
C. The use of white space on the page (spacing, margins, etc.) allows the intended audience to easily focus on
the text and message without distractions. There is just the right amount of balance of white space and text
on the page. The formatting suits the purpose for writing.
D. The use of a title, side heads, page numbering, bullets, and evidence of correct use of a style sheet (when
appropriate) makes it easy for the reader to access the desired information and text. These markers allow
the hierarchy of information to be clear to the reader.
E. When appropriate to the purpose and audience, there is effective integration of text and illustrations,
charts, graphs, maps, tables, etc. There is clear alignment between the text and visuals. The visuals
support and clarify important information or key points made in the text.
The writer’s message is understandable in this format.
A. Handwriting is readable, although there may be discrepancies in letter shape and form, slant, and
spacing that may make some words or passages easier to read than others.
B. Experimentation with fonts and font sizes is successful in some places, but begins to get fussy and
cluttered in others. The effect is not consistent throughout the text.
C. While margins may be present, some text may crowd the edges. Consistent spacing is applied, although a
different choice may make text more accessible (e.g., single, double, or triple spacing).
D. Although some markers are present (titles, numbering, bullets, side heads, etc.), they are not used to their
fullest potential as a guide for the reader to access the greatest meaning from the text.
E. An attempt is made to integrate visuals and the text although the connections may be limited.
The reader receives a garbled message due to problems relating to the presentation of the text.
A. Because the letters are irregularly slanted, formed inconsistently, or incorrectly, and the spacing is
unbalanced or not even present, it is very difficult to read and understand the text.
B. The writer has gone wild with multiple fonts and font sizes. It is a major distraction to the reader.
C. The spacing is random and confusing to the reader. There may be little or no white space on the page.
D. Lack of markers (title, page numbering, bullets, side heads, etc.) leave the reader wondering how one
section connects to another and why the text is organized in this manner on the page.
E. The visuals do not support or further illustrate key ideas presented in the text. They may be misleading,
indecipherable, or too complex to be understood.

The reader is confused due to problems relating to the presentation of the text.

 

A bare beginning; writer not yet showing any control

Collaboration [3]

[4]

Consistently and actively works toward group goals-- is interested, curious, and process-oriented

 

Willingly accepts and fulfills individual role within the group -- interested, curious


Is sensitive to the feelings and learning needs of all group members. -- makes partners' work look good


Consistently and actively contributes knowledge, opinions, and skills --- adds to project and ideas


Values the knowledge, opinion and skills of all group members and encourages their contribution  -- accepts all ideas


Helps group identify necessary changes and encourages group action for change. -- members ideas grow from others' ideas

 

Own ideas are clear to others
 

Works toward group goals without prompting --is interested, curious, and process-oriented


Accepts and fulfills individual role within the group -- interested

 

Shows sensitivity to the feelings of others. -- makes partners' work look good


Contributes knowledge, opinions, and skills without prompting -- adds to project and ideas


Willingly participates in needed changes -- members ideas grow from others' ideas
 

Own ideas are clear to others

Works toward group goals with occasional prompting.


Contributes to the group with occasional prompting.


Shows sensitivity to the feelings of others. attempts to makes partners' work look good


Participates in needed changes, with occasional prompting.

 

Attempts to make own ideas clear

 

Works toward group goals only when prompted.


Contributes to the group only when prompted.


Needs occasional reminders to be sensitive to the feelings of others.


Participates in needed changes when prompted and encouraged.  

A bare beginning; writer not yet participate as  team member

 

 

About Collaboration [5]

 

Bold text included in rubric.

 

So, what do learners need to know to better understand what collaboration really means?

  • Collaboration absolutely requires the participation of two or more people; if you could accomplish the work by yourself, you’re cooperating, not collaborating.
  • Collaboration Is enhanced by “accepting every offer” and “making your partner look good.”  Focus on what you can add to what others have suggested rather than revising or fixing their ideas or solutions.
  • Collaboration is facilitated by group members that focus on being *interested* rather than being *interesting* - be curious about others’ ideas, explore the possibilities, enjoy the process rather than focusing to quickly on the outcome.
  • Collaboration demands bi-directional communication in which your ideas are shaped by the ideas of others; you must work to make sure your ideas are comprehensible.

 

Principles of Holistic Scoring: [6]

 

Density:  Weigh the proportion of errors to the amount of writing done well. This includes the ratio of errors to length.

Variety:  Consider the range of errors across the categories included in the rubric (usage, grammar, spelling, capitalization, punctuation, sentence formation, and paragraphing). 

Severity:  Weigh basic errors more heavily than higher level errors. Also, weigh basic spelling and sentence formation errors more heavily.

 

Footnotes

  1. *Adapted from: Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory 101 SW Main, Suite 500, Portland, OR 97204 Telephone (503) 275-9500 Assessment & Evaluation: Six-Trait Writing Model
  2. Oregon Department of Education is happy to grant you permission to use our scoring guides as part of your instruction. We ask that you give proper credit to Oregon Department of Education if you are planning to publish them in any sort. Thank you for your request. Sincerely, Kim A. Miller Education Specialist - ELPA and Writing Office of Assessment and Information Services Oregon Department of Education 503-947-5829 Fax 503-378-5156 kim.a.miller@state.or.us
  3. Schools of California Online Resources for Education http://www.sdcoe.k12.ca.us/score/actbank/collaborub.html
  4. Chris / cmduke: http://www.cmduke.com/2008/11/explaining-collaboration-to-learners/
  5. Chris / cmduke: http://www.cmduke.com/2008/11/explaining-collaboration-to-learners/
  6. OSPI docment: http://www.k12.wa.us/assessment/WASL/Writing/annotations/2008/2008Gr7Introduction.pdf, p. vi.

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