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My Project Notes

Page history last edited by Ms. Edwards 11 years, 11 months ago

Create your personal project notes page using the "My Project Notes" template.

 

Name of Project

Your Code Name

 

Directions:

  1. Read your the question/topic/task/etc. of your assigment. 
  2. Write the topic in Heading 1 format.
  3. Write the date in normal format.
  4. Write your notes, sources, citations, links to sources/images/documents.
  5. Write a gist statement of what you learned.
  6. Insert a horizontal line. after each source and notes to keep them separae.
  7. Lastly, write a summary of all your research. Read your summary and decide on a metaphor with which to frame your facts to support your opinion to share with the president.
    • Re-read your summary to gather an image, experience, or word that symbolizes what the facts and your opinion represent.
    • Think of a single word, a story/historical reference, or a personal experience that can provide a visual way to explain your idea. It will be like "surrounding it much like a window frame surrounds a glass pane or a decorative frame surrounds a picture or mirror. Just as the right picture frame becomes one with the painting, the right rhetorical frame becomes one with the composition, enhancing as well as complementing."[1]
    • Refer to this frame as you introduce and conclude your letter.
    • Let the frame reinforce the main idea or bring in a sense of humor.
    • Examples from Romana Hillebrand:
      • Story/Poem Frame: "a student in my research class wrote a lengthy paper on the relationship between humans and plants, beginning her rather serious topic with a reference to a well-known nursery rhyme: 'Ring around the roses, a pocket full of posies . . . .'  She explains that the pocket full of flowers masked the stench of death during the time of the black plague, only one of the many useful purposes of plants that have benefited us throughout the ages. The paper ends with a reinforcement of the warning that we depend on plant life to add quality to our own lives: "Without plants, life on Earth would cease to exist as we know it: `ashes, ashes, we all fall down.'" and

      • Personal Experience Frame: "One student, writing about her struggle with obesity, puts to use the question that opens Snow White: 'Mirror, mirror on the wall, who is the fairest of them all?' The student quickly explains that, in her world, "fairest" is changed to "fattest." She further connects the device by describing her despair each time she stands before that cruel mirror. After revealing her struggle and her growing awareness of others who, for various reasons, do not "fit in," the paper ends with a new version of the mirror question: 'Who is the healthiest of them all?'" [2]

    • Introductions and conclusions tie your ideas together; using a story or experience frame adds a familiar and visual context that just may convince your readers to your view!

 

Optional:

You may want to use a table to help you keep your sources and notes organized. I've provide a sample one for you, which you can delete or use.


Topic

Date

 

 

Notes

 

Sources

 

Citations

 

Links

 

Summary

 

Frame


 

Optional Table:

 

Topic

Title of Source

Citation, Link, Footnote

Notes

My Interpretation

Comment

Use it!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Summary

 

Frame


 

 

 




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Footnotes

  1. It's a Frame Up: Helping Students Devise Beginnings and Endings By: Romana Hillebrand Publication: The Quarterly, Vol. 23, No. 1 Date: Winter 2001
  2. It's a Frame Up: Helping Students Devise Beginnings and Endings By: Romana Hillebrand Publication: The Quarterly, Vol. 23, No. 1 Date: Winter 2001

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