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ESSAY Tips

Page history last edited by Ms. Edwards 11 years, 9 months ago

EALRS and ESSAY Process

 

 

1.1.1 Applies more than one strategy for generating ideas and planning writing. Generates ideas prior to organizing them and adjusts prewriting strategies accordingly (e.g., brainstorms a list, selects relevant ideas/details to include in piece of writing, uses a story board). Gathers information from a range of sources, formulates questions, and uses an organizer (e.g., electronic graphic organizer, chart) to analyze and/or synthesize to plan writeg.

 

3.1.1. Develops ideas and organizes writing. Analyzes ideas, selects a manageable topic, and elaborates using specific, relevant details and/or examples. Selects specific details relevant to the topic to extend ideas and develop elaboration (multiple examples, statistics, anecdotes, reasons).

 

3.2.2--Identify, analyze, select language appropriate for specific audiences and purposes.

 

4. 1 The student analyzes and evaluates the effectiveness of written work.

 

1.4.1 Edits for conventions

 

1.3.1 Revises text, including changing words, sentences, paragraphs, and ideas. Rereads work several times and has a different focus for each reading (e.g., first reading — looking for variety of sentence structure and length; second reading — checking for clarity and specific word choice; third reading — checking for layers of elaboration and persuasive language).

 

Essay Plan

 

PREWRITE

 

2.1.1 Audience 2.2.1 Purpose

To whom are you writing? What will they want to know?

Why are you writing? Choose ideas and details that match your purpose.

 

1.1.1 Gather information or organize it: Use a web, tree, or list.

 

  • WEB : (Click for a sample web prewriting)

Put your central idea in the center circle of the web. Each line from the web represents a new idea and paragraph to support your central idea. Add lines (at least three, but preferably six) to each of the three supporting idea lines. On those lines write specific details (examples, explanations, evidence, elaboration, experiences, who, what, when, where, why, how) about EACH of your three supporting ideas. This organizes your work into three paragraphs, complete with your topic sentence ideas.

 

  • TREE : (Click for a sample tree prewriting)

Put your central idea in the trunk of your tree. Each branch from the tree trunk represents a new idea and paragraph to support your central idea. Add smaller branches or leaves (at least three, but preferably six) to each of the three supporting idea branches. On those branches or leaves write specific details (examples, explanations, evidence, elaboration, experiences, who, what, when, where, why, how) about EACH of your three supporting ideas. This organizes your work into three paragraphs, complete with your topic sentence ideas.

 

  • LIST : (Click for a sample list prewriting)

Put your central idea as the title of the list. Number 1-3 with six -eight spaces in between them. Write your three main ideas that support your title idea beside each number. In the spaces below each number, write specific details (examples, explanations, evidence, elaboration, experiences, who, what, when, where, why, how) about EACH of your three supporting ideas. This organizes your work into three paragraphs, complete with your topic sentence ideas.

 

DRAFT (Double space)

 

1.2.1 Analyzes task and composes multiple drafts when appropriate.

Refer to your prewriting plan.

Draft according to audience, purpose, and time. (Who? Why? When due?)

Assesses draft and/or feedback, decides if multiple drafts are necessary, and explains decision.-- after drafting, share with a peer who will ask you questions on your organization, details, sentences, voice, etc.

 

 

 

1.3.1 Revises text, including changing words, sentences, paragraphs, and ideas.

· Rereads work several times and has a different focus for each reading (e.g., first reading — looking for variety of sentence structure and length; second reading — checking for clarity and specific word choice; third reading — checking for layers of elaboration and persuasive language).

 

 

REVISE

 

  • Read your draft several times to organize, add details, combine sentences:

 

  • ADD, CUT, REWRITE:

 

1. Reread you prewriting plan and your draft to check that you have stayed on topic for audience and purpose in your draft.

 

2. Reread to shorten some sentences and combine others for sentence fluency: start sentences in different ways; use complete sentences, some short and some long.

 

3. Reread to make sure the sentences flow from one idea to the next with transitions.

 

4. Reread to add vivid verbs and specific nifty nouns. Delete (cut) unnecessary information.

 

5. Reread to add alliteration and voice-- show you really care about the topic by the specific details you add. Have you included a quote? an anecdote or example? a question?

 

6. Reread to add your introduction (grabber beginning, background knowledge, thesis statement) and conclusion (summary statement, tie to introduction, leave reader with a thought).

 

EDIT

 

1.4.1 Edits for conventions (see 3.3).

 

Reread your revised draft to correct all errors. Use a dictionary or computer to check your spelling. Check you Write Source for punctuation, spelling, capitalization rules. Ask a friend to edit also.

 

PUBLISH

 

Component 1.5: Publishes text to share with audience.

  • Write your final draft.

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